Migration in Mexico

Updated: 11/20/2018 1:22:06 AM
The US temporarily closed its busiest border crossing with Mexico to boost security after a migrant caravan arrived in northern Mexico.
Northbound traffic and half the pedestrian crossings at the San Ysidro border point were shut to install new movable wire-topped barriers. Around 110,000 people enter the US daily through the crossing.
Trump called the caravan a potential “invasion” and responded by mobilizing the military to the border. The immigrants, mostly Central Americans, said they fled their home countries to escape violence, corruption and poverty.
A US judge has temporarily blocked an order by President Donald Trump that barred asylum for immigrants who enter the country illegally from Mexico, the latest courtroom defeat for Mr Trump on immigration policy. US District Judge Jon Tigar in San Francisco issued a temporary restraining order against the asylum rules. His order takes effect immediately, applies nationwide, and lasts until at least 19 December when the judge scheduled a hearing to consider a more long-lasting injunction.
Source: DORRIS

Published Monday, November 19, 2018

Hundreds of Tijuana residents congregated around a monument in an affluent section of the city south of California on Sunday to protest the thousands of Central American migrants who have arrived via caravan in hopes of a new life in the U.S. Tensions have built as nearly 3,000 migrants from the caravan poured into Tijuana in recent days after more than a month on the road, and with many more months ahead of them while they seek asylum.

The federal government estimates the number of migrants could soon swell to 10,000. U.S. border inspectors are processing only about 100 asylum claims a day at Tijuana's main crossing to San Diego.

On Sunday, displeased Tijuana residents waved Mexican flags, sang the Mexican national anthem and chanted "Out! Out!" in front of a statue of the Aztec ruler Cuauhtemoc, 1.6 kilometers from the U.S. border.

They accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana. They also complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an "invasion." And they voiced worries that their taxes might be spent to care for the group. "We don't want them in Tijuana," protesters shouted.

Dozens of migrants in the caravan who have been interviewed by Associated Press reporters have said they left their country after death threats. But the journey has been hard, and many have turned around.

Alden Rivera, the Honduran ambassador in Mexico, told the AP on Saturday that 1,800 Hondurans have returned to their country since the caravan first set out on Oct. 13, and that he hopes more will make that decision. "We want them to return to Honduras," said Rivera.

Honduras has a murder rate of 43 per 100,000 residents, similar to U.S. cities like New Orleans and Detroit. In addition to violence, migrants in the caravan have mentioned poor economic prospects as a motivator for their departures.

Tijuana Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum has called the migrants' arrival an "avalanche" that the city is ill-prepared to handle, calculating that they will be in Tijuana for at least six months as they wait to file asylum claims. Gastelum has appealed to the federal government for more assistance to cope with the influx.
Source: DORRIS

Migration in Mexico Facts

Power: 0
Affected Area: 10 km.
Alert Level: Green
Category: Security
Response: Avoid
Severity: Extreme
Urgency: Immediate
Certainty: Observed

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